02
Mar
10

The Problem with a Faulty Spam Filter

I have a racist in-law. But then again, who doesn’t?

I don’t see a lot of this guy, because my wife only begrudgingly let him back into her life after a decade of exile. She has not exactly done cartwheels over the decision, but we’re stuck with him now.

Clearly, this man is not particularly close to his relative, my wife, or else he would have noticed that she disgraced the master race by marrying a Latino. My guess is that he thinks I just spend a lot of time in the tanning booth.

It’s important to note that my in-law is not overt about his bigotry. He either isn’t as virulent as, say, 1950s Strom Thurmond, or more likely, he doesn’t have the cojones to be upfront about it.

Of course, this brings up the uncomfortable truth that we now have degrees of racism. In the old days, a person was either a hate-filled redneck with a noose in one hand, or he was a progressive, love-thy-neighbor type who was incapable of seeing race, much less discriminating against someone.

But a more nuanced view has come into play in recent years. This viewpoint holds that everyone has some level of unconscious prejudice. At its lowest level, it may be the white woman who grips her purse a little tighter when a black man passes her on the street. From there, we ratchet up the intensity until we reach Klan level.

My in-law is somewhere between those poles. His dancing around the issue makes his prejudice less obnoxious in person and, on occasion, even unintentionally hilarious.

Recently, he sent us a forwarded email that slammed Obama’s immigration-reform plan. Perhaps I should have pointed out to him that there is no Obama immigration-reform plan, per se, but that would have prevented me from savoring the deeply astute political viewpoints that the email expressed.

  • There was a lot about English being under attack.
  • There was something about immigrants breeding out of control.
  • There were a few lines about Mexicans stealing our jobs.

Yes, I learned a lot from my quick glance at the missive. Most interestingly, the email detoured into how Anglo-Saxon culture was the only basis for American values. The email gave white people credit for ending slavery in America (neglecting the obvious fact that white people were responsible for slavery in the first place). I must admit that this was an interpretation of history that I had never considered.

The forward ended, rather ominously, with the declaration that white people can, at any point, take back everything they have generously given the rest of America.

I wasn’t sure what response my in-law wanted. Like I said, I barely know the guy.

Is it more proper to call him on his bullshit? Or would that just be a waste of time that does nothing but jack up everyone’s blood pressure? Is it standing up for oneself and La Raza to go on the counteroffensive? Or is it more dignified to dismiss idiocy with the split-second contempt that it deserves? Like many things in life, dealing with racists offers valid arguments for contradictory courses of action.

In the end, I just deleted the man’s rant and made a mental note to do the same whenever he sends us another email.

He’s since forwarded numerous other manifestos, but I’ve deleted them automatically, declining the opportunity to learn how Obama is a socialist who wasn’t even born in this country and wants to give all my money to gay, flag-burning immigrants.

All that can wait until my next face-to-face discussion with my in-law, whenever that is. I’m sure he’ll start the conversation with “I’m not racist, but…”

Yes, good times are coming.

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4 Responses to “The Problem with a Faulty Spam Filter”


  1. March 3, 2010 at 1:09 am

    Sorry you have to deal with someone like that.

    Will you do any more to stand up to his racism in person that you do (or rather, don’t do) to his emails? Just wondering how you would do that . . . here’s hoping your wife will pitch in too.

    Down with colorblind racism!

  2. 2 hfanatic
    March 3, 2010 at 5:07 pm

    Like I said, he’s much less confrontational in person, so there’s nothing to stand up to when I actually see him (unless I want to pick a fight; don’t rule it out).

  3. March 3, 2010 at 10:09 pm

    Yes, the whole thing is really too ridiculous to respond to. Where would you even start?

    If he starts at it in person, I would nip it in the bud: “Look, this is my heritage. I speak two languages, and my ancestors immigrated just like yours did. I find your rhetoric uninformed and insulting. I’m willing to have a familial relationship with you, despite your views that are hurtful and lead to mistreatment and even violence against people like me and my family. So, while you’re in my presence, have enough respect for me to lay off.”

    Or something.

    What a jerk.

  4. March 14, 2010 at 3:59 pm

    “…white people can, at any point, take back everything they have generously given the rest of America.”

    Um…delusional much?

    Sounds like your in-law is a total draptoresponsic.

    Glad I found you. I’m going to browse the rest of your work now.


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